HRM should focus on employees’ life stages rather than age

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN JOB DEMANDS, JOB RESOURCES, STRAIN, AND WORK ENJOYMENT: A MATTER OF AGE?

Bert Schreurs, Anja Van den Broeck, Guy Notelaers, Beate Van der Heijden, & Hans De Witte

Published in Gedrag & Organisatie

Drawing on the Selection-Optimization-Compensation theory and the Job Demands-Resources model this study addresses the following research questions: (1) are there mean differences in the perceived levels of particular job characteristics between employees from different age groups; and (2) to what extent does the relationship between job characteristics and work outcomes (i.e., job strain and work enjoyment) differ across age groups? Data were collected from a sample of 15,464 employees, of which 3,850 were younger than 35 (young group), 7,273 were between 36 and 45 (middle group), and 4,341 were older than 45 (old group). Significant age differences were found in the levels of job characteristics: Young employees are most positive about their relationships with their colleagues and direct supervisor, and report to have the lowest levels of workload; employees from the middle group report to have the highest levels of role conflict; employees from the oldest age group perceive to have the highest levels of autonomy, and perceive more than other employees to be confronted with hindering changes at work. In addition, the strength of the relationship between job characteristics and work outcomes differed across age groups, although differences were rather small. From this we conclude that HR management should focus on creating high-quality jobs for all employees, young and old.

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CARMA courses during the 2012 EURAM conference

CARMA is proud to be hosting a series of courses as a pre-conference event for the 2012 EURAM conference.

Short Course Topics and Instructors

  • “Qualitative Research Methods for Cross-Cultural Research” – Dr. Tine Köhler, University of Melbourne
  • “Introduction to Structural Equation Methods” – Dr. Larry Williams, Wayne State University
  • “Scale Development” – Dr. Jeremy Dawson, University of Sheffield
  • “Multilevel Analysis with R” – Dr. Hetty van Emmerik, Dr. Hannes Günter, and Dr. Bert Schreurs, Maastricht University

Short Course Outlines

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Advanced Registration Deadline & Registration Information

The advanced registration deadline is May 4, 2012. Please note that a $60 late fee will be added to the total price after this date.

To register, you must be a CARMA Website User. Becoming a CARMA Website User is free of charge. To become a CARMA Website User, please click here.

To register for CARMA Short Courses in Rotterdam, The Netherlands click here.

Prices per Course: *All prices are in US Dollars (USD)

  • Faculty/Professional: $640.00
  • Students: $480.00
  • CARMA Members Faculty/Professional: $320.00
  • CARMA Members Students: $240.00

Job insecurity fluctuates within persons

A WEEKLY DIARY STUDY ON THE BUFFERING ROLE OF SOCIAL SUPPORT IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN JOB INSECURITY AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE

Bert Schreurs, Hetty van Emmerik, Hannes Guenter, & Filip Germeys

published in Human Resource Management 

In this article, the authors used a within-person design to examine the relationship between job insecurity and employee in-role and extra-role performance, and the buffering role of time-varying work-based support (i.e., supervisor and colleague support) in this relationship. Weekly diary data gathered over the course of three weeks from 56 employees confronted with organizational restructuring and analyzed with a hierarchical linear modeling approach showed that weekly fl uctuations in job insecurity negatively predicted week-level in-role performance. As predicted, supervisor support moderated the intra-individual relationship between job insecurity and in-role performance, so that employees’ in-role performance suffered less from feeling job insecurity during weeks in which they received more support from their supervisor. No relationship between job insecurity and extra-role performance was observed. This within-person study contributes to research on job insecurity that has primarily focused on inter-individual differences in job insecurity and their associations with job performance. Theoretical and practical implications for human resource management are discussed.